Dr Satchin Panda monitored pregnant women and working mums with babies and their patterns were very erratic. In fact, their patterns are most like firefighters, who expected to be worked up several times every night.
For many women, the hardest part of motherhood is working against your body clock to stay awake at night and trying to catch up on sleep at odd hours of the day. The only time new mums actually got good sleep, not surprisingly was when they have some help beyond their spouse/partner, like in-laws or parents who could share some of the work at night.
Working mothers have the roughest time syncing their lives to a daily rhythm because their day is affected by everyone else in the home. Typically, working mothers wake up very early to get breakfast ready for the family, prepare kids, pack the lunch bags and backpacks, get the kids to school or day care, and then get themselves to work. After dinner, they oversee homework, exercise, or work at home late into the night. As the week goes on, their circadian disruption becomes more severe. For instance, many mothers of infants find that by Friday they literally fall ill, and it takes them all weekend to recover.
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